Everyday Kanban

Discussing Management, Teams, Agile, Lean, Kanban & more

Category: Management (page 3 of 25)

Kanban board filters can streamline your daily standups

If I had a nickel for every time I’ve heard someone say “the board will be so cluttered if we put all of this work on there,” then I would be… well… richer than I am now!  In all seriousness, I love that statement because it gives me an opportunity to discuss how necessary it is to face our reality, no matter how messy. If we force ourselves to see the ugly truth, we’re much more motivated to improve it and others are more understanding when you talk to them. Instead of hiding the mess, we need to learn to navigate it when we need information quickly, like in a daily standup. Fortunately,  many virtual tools, like JIRA, provide quick filtering capability with their visual boards for this very purpose.

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Comfort and Safety are not the same thing

balancing stones

Comfort. Safety. We get these two confused. Did you ever know something but it took someone saying the concept out loud for you to take notice of it and think about it? This week, Gitte Klitgaard made me realize how often we conflate comfort and safety. You can be comfortable overeating, but that’s not safe. You can be comfortable doing way too much work or using yelling as your primary means of communication, but neither are safe. They just feel safe because that’s what we are used to doing. Making “safety nets” more visible is a sustainable way to help people embrace necessary change – change that moves us towards safety.

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Beware of lonely numbers

Cupcake with a one-shaped candle

This week I’ve been listening to the highly recommended book Factfulness: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World–and Why Things Are Better Than You Think  written by Swedish legend, Hans Rosling. “Factfulness” really challenges us to revisit our assumptions about binary constructs like “us vs. them” or “developed world vs. developing world.” Most of us in the “western world” still think in terms of the “haves vs. the have nots” but Rosling shows us how old that thinking really is and why we should be moving to a model of thinking in a spectrum. The book is really eye opening and, so far, there’s one piece of advice that I feel is especially critical for us all to adopt.

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