Everyday Kanban

Discussing Management, Teams, Agile, Lean, Kanban & more

Category: Management (page 1 of 25)

Managers can still be a valuable addition to a team

I recently gave a talk at the Øredev developer conference in Malmö in order to share how managers can be effective and valued in today’s organizations. Watch and let me know what you think.

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What if there is no right or wrong?

When I watch the news, read social media, or listen to arguments about how to do something, I am struck by how far we’ve gone into the land of right vs. wrong. Unfortunately, it doesn’t feel like we’re just passing through. Instead, it seems we’ve built permanent structures and are settling in for the long haul.

An example: U.S. Politics

To understand what I mean, you need to look no farther than the US political scene. In a two-party system, there is meant to be constructive conflict between adversaries that results in largely beneficial outcomes for the citizens the two parties serve. Working through the merits of different viewpoints allows people to come to better solutions for tricky questions like “How much should the government spend on social services?” or “When should the federal government make laws vs deferring to state government?”

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You might not use releases, but you still need cadences!

Release button on Jira board

The release button on a Jira Kanban board can be immensely useful even when you don’t do releases!

When you’re using a continuous flow process you don’t always have the concept of releases. But, even when you don’t have releases or iterations, it doesn’t mean that you don’t care about what you’re able to forecast or accomplish in a particular time span.  Cadences are extremely important because they help us create habits, for better or worse, and they make sure that we pay attention to things at certain intervals. The alternative is that we think we’ll get around to things and we never do… time flies by and we don’t give things the attention they deserve. Scrum builds in the concept of iterations for which you measure velocity in order to plan for future iterations. In a continuous flow process like Kanban, you still have to look at throughput over time so you can do light forecasting and to reflect on what’s been accomplished. You still need cadences, you just don’t stop the flow for releasing or planning. No matter what method you’re using, it’s always helpful to be able to easily see and discuss what has been accomplished over the past week, month or quarter.

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