Everyday Kanban

Discussing Management, Teams, Agile, Lean, Kanban & more

Category: General (page 1 of 6)

What if there is no right or wrong?

When I watch the news, read social media, or listen to arguments about how to do something, I am struck by how far we’ve gone into the land of right vs. wrong. Unfortunately, it doesn’t feel like we’re just passing through. Instead, it seems we’ve built permanent structures and are settling in for the long haul.

An example: U.S. Politics

To understand what I mean, you need to look no farther than the US political scene. In a two-party system, there is meant to be constructive conflict between adversaries that results in largely beneficial outcomes for the citizens the two parties serve. Working through the merits of different viewpoints allows people to come to better solutions for tricky questions like “How much should the government spend on social services?” or “When should the federal government make laws vs deferring to state government?”

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Video to Watch: The Myth of Multitasking Test

Background Tasking; Switchtasking

Guess what? You’re not actually multitasking. You’re really doing one of two things: background tasking or switchtasking! In this video, Dave Crenshaw, author of “The Myth of Multitasking,” guides you through an experience designed at helping you gain first-hand knowledge of switchtasking and its related costs.

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Is the automation paradox putting you at risk?

robot hand, human hand

Without technology, we would not have many of the things that make life easier today such as microwaves, computers and mobile phones; nor would we have life-saving advancements in the field of healthcare and medical research. People would still be succumbing to preventable diseases at an alarming rate. In today’s society, technology is ubiquitous.  Our children are dubbed “digital natives” because they never experienced a world that didn’t rely on computing power to function.

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